Deep Sea: What is the problem?

A destructive fishing method

The fishing method: deep-sea trawling Around 80% of deep-sea fishing in the world is carried out using deep-sea trawls – an extremely destructive fishing method where enormous weighted nets are dragged across the seabed. Deep-sea trawls tear up everything in their path, from the organisms that make up the sea floor to all the species More…

The deep sea: a rich but fragile environment

Life without light At depths of more than around 200 meters, there is no longer enough sunlight penetrating the ocean for photosynthesis to occur. There are thus no plants in deep-sea ecosystems: no seaweed, seagrass or phytoplankton. The life which develops in the deep sea depends on the organic matter produced at the surface, which More…

IMPACTS OF FISHING

Overview Research carried out in the North Atlantic and the South Pacific has clearly shown that deep-sea trawls destroy almost all large, non-target species, disturb the top layers of sediment (trawl doors can leave furrows up to one meter deep in soft sediments) and, more generally, produce habitats with low biomass and few species. All More…

Carbon Footprint

The Carbon footprint of global fishing A study of 250 fisheries around the world (click here to read the study), taking 2000 as its reference year, shows that 50 billion liters of fuel oil are needed to catch 80 million tons of marine invertebrate fish. The world average is therefore 0.6 liters of fuel oil More…

Unprofitable fishing fleets

In 2009, deep-sea fishing accounted for 1.48% of French fisheries in terms of the volume of catch landed (7300 of 491 720 tons) and 1.43% of sales (€17 M of an overall €1 182 M). SCAPECHE (Intermarché) Statements made by this fishing fleet do not hide its chronic structural weakness, serving only to bring out More…

Fishing funded by our taxes

The total amount of subsidies given to deep-sea fishing fleets is a key element to governance in the public interest, especially given that the activity has a potentially irreversible impact on extremely vulnerable species and environments. Without transparency and cooperation from fishing professionals or the public powers concerned, it is difficult to assemble the data More…

Vulnerable species with low resilience

Deep-sea species are characterized by slow growth, high or extremely high longevity, late sexual maturity and low fertility, biological characteristics which make them extremely vulnerable to exploitation and give them very low resilience. Corals: the planet’s sentries One fact to bear in mind: the diversity of corals in the deep sea is greater than in More…

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